GP658

Podcast: Sounding the world

One of the most wide-ranging of composers was the Russian, Alexander Tcherepnin (1899-1977). He toured the globe as a concert pianist, living in various cities and absorbing other cultures like a sponge. As a result, his music is eclectic and … Read More →


8.573191

Podcast: A reticent English richness

Ralph Vaughan Williams is not especially remembered for his chamber music, being much more popular for his nine symphonies and works for voice and chorus. But the chamber music he composed throughout his long career is now becoming properly appreciated. … Read More →


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Podcast: Poetry for the departed

At its première in June 1969 Shostakovich described his Symphony No. 14, in effect a symphonic song cycle, as ‘a fight for the liberation of humanity… a great protest against death, a reminder to live one’s life honestly, decently, nobly…’ … Read More →


Vastnetsov

Podcast: A legend lives on

Although Reinhold Glière’s Symphony No. 3, subtitled Il’ya Muromets, is rarely performed or recorded, this new Naxos recording confirms that the work deserves the attention of a much wider audience. Performed by the Buffalo Philharmonic and conducted by JoAnn Falletta, … Read More →


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Podcast: Curtain up!

If the purpose of an opera overture is to prepare the audience for the mood and emotions of the opera that follows, Rossini was a master. And yet, the overture was almost an after-thought to him. Rossini usually composed it … Read More →